expr:class='"loading" + data:blog.mobileClass'> MOESLIMORI.COM

NASA's Juno probe captures stunning view of 'magnificent, swirling clouds' on Jupiter

NASA's Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image at 10:23 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:23 a.m. EDT on May 24), as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 9,600 miles (15,500 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a northern latitude of 56 degrees. The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the various swirling cloud formations, NASA said.
Image captures the intensity of the jets and vortices in Jupiter's northern hemisphere 
Massive clouds are made of ammonia-ice crystals, and contain huge cyclonic wind patterns Appearing in the scene are bright-white 'pop-up' clouds as well as an anticyclonic storm known as a white oval
The image, captured in the final minutes of a recent close flyby of Jupiter, NASA's Juno spacecraft captured a departing view of the planet's swirling southern hemisphere. At the time, Juno was about 55,600 miles (89,500 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a southern latitude of approximately 75 degrees.

 NASA has revealed a stunning new image of swirling 'oil painting' storms on Jupiter.
 It shows storms in Jupiter's dynamic North North Temperate Belt captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft. 'Appearing in the scene are several bright-white 'pop-up' clouds as well as an anticyclonic storm, known as a white oval,' NASA said.

The color-enhanced image was taken at 11:31 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (2:31 a.m. EDT on May 24), as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 44,300 miles (71,400 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a southern latitude of 71 degrees
'This provides for an additional 41 months in orbit around Jupiter and will enable Juno to achieve its primary science objectives,' NASA says.
Juno is in 53-day orbits rather than 14-day orbits as initially planned because of a concern about valves on the spacecraft's fuel system. 
This longer orbit means that it will take more time to collect the needed science data.
An independent panel of experts confirmed in April that Juno is on track to achieve its science objectives and is already returning spectacular results. 
The Juno spacecraft and all instruments are healthy and operating nominally.
NASA has now funded Juno through FY 2022.
The end of prime operations is now expected in July 2021, with data analysis and mission close-out activities continuing into 2022.
This color-enhanced image was taken at 1:58 p.m. PDT on Oct. 29, 2018 (4:58 p.m. EDT) as the spacecraft performed its 16th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 4,400 miles (7,000 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, at a latitude of approximately 40 degrees north.






 
Share on Google Plus

About Ariyan J

This is a short description in the author block about the author. You edit it by entering text in the "Biographical Info" field in the user admin panel.
    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...